Averaging nearly 13,000 visitors per year, Tilos has tourism to thank for the majority of its yearly income revenue. However, major problems in recent years for the small island, particularly during the crowded summer months, have pushed the city to now do something to improve the quality of visitor experience, as well as preserve the integrity of the environment on the island. -powered alternatives to the island’s current underwater cable and diesel power plant system have been proposed as the best solutions. The island currently is experiencing issues with blackouts and other faulty utility problems, making businesses and visitors enjoy a less than optimal experience while vacationing.  

Solar-Powered Solutions 

Even though the population during the winter in Tilos, Greece, hovers around 400, this number swells to nearly 3,000 during the summer months. The major influx adds to the strain on Tilo’s current utility. To keep up with summer visitors, the current system will be replaced by a combination of wind and solar power innovations. Project manager, Spyros Aliferis stated that both solar power and wind technologies will work in conjunction to store in batteries. Then, when there is increased demand on the island, they will have back-up energy reserves to accommodate the influx of visitors. This prototype solar battery system will make use of excess solar energy, storing it until it is needed for the busier months. This not only increases the efficiency with which Tilos utilizes solar power, but it will also serve to save the island and its visitors a great deal of money and hassle. 

Many business owners are likely to benefit from the new wind and solar powered utility projects, as they will be less likely to experience outages when running on solar energy. There will be less concern over spoiled food or loss of business due to power outages. Businesses are likely to benefit immediately from these new solar technologies on the island as soon as these solar innovations are permanently set in place. 

Preserving the Environment with Solar Power 

Part of the incentive to implement these solar-powered solutions also lies in the desire to help protect the island’s natural habitats. Using solar power will increase the quality of life not just for residents and visitors, but for the vast array of wildlife creatures that call Tilos home. The current mayor of Tilos, Maria Kamma, believes in preserving the biodiversity of Tilos as much as possible. She hopes that the solar initiatives being set into motion will better preserve the wildlife environments, but also make certain that residents, “have a very good standard of living.” With more than 150 bird species and nearly 350 different plants inhabiting the island of Tilos, using smart solar-powered solutions is the best overall fit for the island’s diverse needs. 

Setting the Standard for Solar Implementation 

Kamma believes that the solar technology and solar power trends we are seeing worldwide today provide the best solutions for all inhabitants of the island. Leaders from the European Commission ultimately agree with Kamma and hope that the solar projects they have used in Tilos will set the standard for solar-powered technology for other Mediterranean islands. Other Greek companies have similarly followed Tilo’s example of implementing solar energy. One such company known as the Eunice Energy Group is also looking to help replicate these same solar and wind energy projects in other locations.  

It is likely that these solar-powered trends being employed on a mass scale for cities across the world will show no signs of slowing down any time soon. Most cities, states, and countries are now starting to see the benefits of solar power for their regions and residents, just like Tilos. Solar power is changing the landscape of tourism, resident quality of life, and the overall production of utility for cities in a positive way. Along with the environmental preservation and reduced cost benefits, solar power quickly is becoming the standard for utility production for businesses and cities everywhere. 

Resources: 

https://www.ecowatch.com/greek-island-wind-solar-power-2597519790.html  

https://apnews.com/22e5eea66f00429d8fc94e5fa8688bc6 

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